Category Archives: ANGEL and online instruction

What is ANGEL, anyway?!

Welcome to everyone who is visiting from our Getting Started workshops and MOITC classes! Please review the video below, which will introduce you to ANGEL, Macomb’s Learning Management System of choice.

Once the video begins playing, you can use the buttons in the bottom-right corner to expand to full-screen, or change the video’s resolution (720p is high-def but may load slower).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiNN-R-tu7Y&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&hd=1]

Let us know what you think, by leaving comments below!

ANGEL 7.4 – beware!

ANGEL 7.4 is coming in a few weeks! Run for your lives! Everything is changing! You’ll have to re-learn everything all over again! Ahhhhhh!

Alright, now that we’ve got that out of the way… allow me to calm your fears. ANGEL 7.4 is rolling out on May 19th, and the CTL is working diligently to insure that the transition is seamless. The updated version is just that, an update. You will not have to completely re-learn ANGEL, or change your strategy for using the LMS in your classroom. Instead, you will be happy to find improvements and new features!

For a highlight of those new features, refer to my previous post. To sign up for one of our “What’s New in ANGEL 7.4” workshops, click the ANGEL Workshops link over here —->

To investigate the new features in detail, check out our new video tutorials and step-by-step documents, which are available on the College Intranet. (Navigate to the Intranet, click on “Resources” and then “Center for Teaching and Learning.”)

And as always, let us know what you think!

ANGEL upgrade teaser

In May, we will be upgrading our ANGEL learning management system from version 7.2 to 7.4. I know, a 0.2 upgrade doesn’t sound like much, but trust me, there are some very significant enhancements in the new version that will undoubtedly make your ANGEL experience more enjoyable… not that it wasn’t already enjoyable, right?!

Click on the adjacent image for a sneak-peak at the new features. Just keep this on the down-low, because this is highly classified information and I don’t want any trouble! Ha.

The online courses debate

Ever since Macomb’s own Mark Champagne provided his insights on the future of online learning, the whole country has been buzzing (we kid because we like Mark)! Take, for example, this article from the New York Times “Room for Debate” column, in which experts and readers weighed-in on the hottest topic confronting higher education today.

Put on your gloves, step into the ring, and let us know what you think! Specifically, which of “The Editors” do you most agree with, and why?

PS: Thank you, Matthew Cross for providing the link. If you have any ideas for a blog post, send it my way!

PDF Power – part 1

I’ll just come right out and say it- the PDF is one of the most useful yet misunderstood concepts in instructional technology. Well have no fear, because the CTL Blog is here to shed some light on the subject! (Insert nostalgic, superhero theme song here.) To make this as painless as possible, I’ve created the unofficial guide to everything that you need to know about PDFs… For Dummies… Cliff Notes… abridged edition 1.0!

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‘Tis the season for file sharing!

No, not THAT kind of file sharing (whatever happened to the Napster kid, anyway?). We’re talking about the legal kind. We’re talking about instructors sharing files with other instructors.  For example, if you’re a Math instructor, and would like to provide new instructors in your department with lesson plan suggestions, useful links, and shared handouts, how do you distribute those useful files?

At Macomb, everyone knows about “The P Drive,” and we also know that it’s not the safest, most practical solution for collaboration. And no one wants to bother with email file attachments if they don’t have to. You do have other options!

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Group projects with Google Docs

Group projects are an invaluable learning tool, there’s no denying that fact. When incorporated into a balanced lesson plan, group work helps to nurture many skills that students will need in the real world, such as:

  1. an understanding the dynamics of a team and member roles
  2. professional behaviors like meeting deadlines and taking responsibility
  3. ability to work with others through complex problems

Great, so let’s assign some group projects! But hold on just a minute, there are a few issues that we’ll have to deal if this is going to work. First of all, what if the students in some of the groups have difficulty syncing up their schedules to meet outside of class? Or, worse, yet, what if you’re teaching an online class? What then? Well, those multicolored, search-crazy folks over at Google may just have an answer for you!

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