Facebook for Academia

Annnnd, we’re back! The mad dash at the beginning of the semester has subsided, and we’ve got some new bits of instructional technology goodness to share with you. To kick things off today, let’s take a look at www.Academia.edu, which has been affectionately referred to as the “Facebook for academia!”

We’ve all heard of Facebook, and some of us may even be using it in our classrooms. Facebook is useful for many things, but if you’re trying to connect with other professionals in your field, it leaves a little to be desired. That’s where Academia.edu comes in. It is free to create an account, after which you can take advantage of the site’s tools and resources.

Imagine you are a humanities instructor, specializing in mythology and etymology (oh, and we just happen to have someone like that working in the CTL), and you’re writing a paper on, or teaching a lesson related to, The Odyssey. With Academia.edu, you can quickly find and “follow” others who are also studying the Odyssey, read their papers, and exchange ideas with them directly through the site’s messaging system.

Other interesting uses of Academia.edu include; the ability to post an interactive CV, sharing of useful web resources, finding talks and conferences in your area, and stat-tracking on your posted talks and papers. Oh, and if you’re really good (or just lucky), you might even be discovered by a publisher through Academia.edu!

And finally, Academia.edu can be fun, too… in slightly-geeky, discipline-specific kinda way. We all know who the rock stars of our disciplines are, and many of them are on Academia.edu. If there are there any theoretical physicists reading this, you need to get on Academia.edu, because Stephen Hawking is waiting for you to follow his work!

Academia.edu is young and growing fast. If you find this concept interesting, if you’re thinking of joining and need some advice, or if you just want to share your thoughts, please leave your comments below!

nnnnd, we’re back! The mad dash at the beginning of the semester has subsided, and we’ve got some new bits of instructional technology goodness to share with you. To kick things off today, let’s take a look at www.Academia.edu, which has been affectionately referred to by its users as the “Facebook for academia!”

We’ve all heard of Facebook, and some of us may even be using it in our classrooms. Facebook is great for many things, but if you’re trying to connect with other professionals in your field, however, it leaves a little to be desired. That’s where Academia.edu comes in. It is free to create an account, after which you can take advantage of the site’s tools and resources.

Imagine you are a humanities instructor, specializing in mythology and etymology (oh, and we just happen to have someone like that working in the CTL!), and you’re writing a paper on, or teaching a lessons related to, The Odyssey. With Academia.edu, you can quickly find and “follow” others who are also studying the Odyssey, read their papers, and exchange ideas with them directly through the site’s messaging system.

Other interesting uses of Academia.edu include; the ability to post an interactive CV, sharing of useful web resources, finding talks and conferences in your area, and simply seeing which of your posted papers others respond to the most by tracking your hits.

could find and “follow” others who share your professional interests, post to your profile You can post links to your favorite web resources, post updates on what you’re currently working on, share information on conferences you’re attending, searching the online community and “follow” those in (or out of) your field. Each member’s profile can contain updates on what you’re working on, conferen

type a short description of yourself, upload some of your papers, list some of your favorite topic-related websites, and add your CV.

It’s free to join, and offers the following features:

  • “following” sharing their research and following the works of other like-minded professionals. Signing up is free.

1 Join Academia.edu

Be part of a growing community
2 Find your colleagues
Search by research interests and departments
3 Follow their work
See their latest papers, talks and status updates in your News Feed
4 Share your research
Upload your papers and talks
Be notified when someone searches for you on Google
Stats on paper views and downloads
Upload and share your papers and talks

For example, if you were a humanities instructor who taught mythology, etymology…
professional networking with other academics (their publications, teaching materials, preliminary papers, for [scribdib] ex: an article that noam chomsky (linguist))…. and follow other “researchers” out of your field of study

discover conferences (status, like Facebook’s Wall)

primarily used to follow research, publishers may discover

interactive curriculum vitae (link to items)

stephen hawking

“Following the work of” similar to “frieinding” people on Facebook, follow the rock stars of your discipline… or maybe they’ll even follow you!

track the “hits” that you get after posting on your wall, or adding new research, and get a feel for the work that others want to see

only about a year-and-half old, growing fast…

more interactive than linked-in

Yes Facebook for Faculty it good, but also it allows people to follow your research, publications, and speaking engagements.  It is a great tool for Academics to organize an interactive CV.  If you sent in an abstract or apply for a job this is a great way to publicize yourself.  Often publishers will look for scholars to publish.

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